Staying cool during a summer moving project is a matter of health and safety. Every year, new people move into Phoenix from other areas of the country. New arrivals may be unfamiliar with the kind of heat waves common in this part of Arizona. Anyone can get heat stroke, but the risk is higher for new arrivals and people with certain conditions.

Heat stroke is a serious concern for anyone engaged in moving during the hot summer months in Phoenix. Make sure that you know if anyone helping you move takes medications. Some of them cause dehydration, which increases the risk of heat stroke. These people should avoid helping if possible, or only assign them light work during the coolest times of the day.

These six tips will help you to avoid the dangers of heat stroke or heat exhaustion while moving in Phoenix:

1. Pack in the evening, and move in the morning

The time of day should determine the amount of work that you can expect to get done. During the week before the move, pack during the coolest times of the day. On moving day, move the heaviest items first. Stay organized and complete all of the packing in advance. Try to get other people to help. This reduces the number of trips you need to make for large items like furniture, tools, and other heavy supplies.

2. Use water intelligently

This tip applies to both internal hydration as well as external methods of cooling the skin. If you have an ice cooler, keep a spray bottle inside with the drinks. Every time you enjoy sipping some water, spray your skin with cool water. Stand in front of a strong, portable fan until you get relief from the heat. Make sure you have enough batteries if you’re using the fan beyond the range of an electric outlet. Taking regular cooling breaks to minimize the risk of heat stroke.

3. Clothing counts

Light, loose fabrics allow your skin to remain relatively cool. Inexperienced movers often select the wrong material and find out too late why it matters. Synthetic materials like polyester or rayon can increase the retention of heat, which increases sweating. Light-colored apparel reflects sunlight and helps you to stay cool. Darker colors absorb the heat and increase your body temperature. Cover your head with a hat.

4. Assign tasks in advance

Planning in advance reduces the amount of time needed to accomplish the move. Make sure that your detailed plan delegates all major tasks. This way, you can check each item off as the task gets completed. This keeps the process as efficient as possible.

5. Pace yourself and your moving team:

Moving is hard work, but the summer heat can make it even harder. Pace the amount of work that will be expected of each person. If someone needs to take a break, make sure that there is a room or space available with cool water, a spray bottle, cool towels, and a fan. Have a rest area prepared for the moments when someone is showing signs of fatigue. This simple precaution helps you to avoid the risk of anyone on your team getting heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

6. Consider hiring professional movers

Consider the benefits of hiring a moving company with a good reputation and licensed, insured movers, like us at Low Budget Movers in Phoenix. It does mean that you can sip lemonade and let someone else do all the heavy lifting. However, if you elect to go this route, plan accordingly. Don’t schedule your move during a busy time. You might pay for the delays that go along with major holiday weekends, for example. Traffic congestion and high demand for movers can drive up the total moving cost, so plan ahead. Schedule your move during the low-demand periods.

Final Tips

Any medical condition that impairs the thermal regulation of the body increase vulnerability to heat stroke. This includes old age, obesity, and chronic illnesses. Keep a thermometer ready, and take the temperature of anyone who appears dizzy, agitated, confused, or irritated. Slurred speech and seizures are other symptoms. Organize emergency contacts in case medical assistance is needed. Prevention is the best kind of planning.

Article provided by Low Budget Movers in Phoenix.

Posted by Danny Imes