Out with the old and in with the new—habits, that is. Everyone has some bad habits—and every new year, many resolve to start new habits and break bad ones that are holding them back in life and in their career. To help you use this time to build strong, positive habits, the Valley Young Professionals Board of Directors share insights on their most valuable habits and how good habits can lead to success.

Question: What is one habit you have currently that you want to continue, and one habit you want to eliminate?

TJ. Mitchell, Associate, Polsinelli

Answer: Refocusing on my physical health and learning to tell people “no.” As young professionals, it can be easy to place our health and physical well-being at the bottom of our priority list, behind work, family, and other commitments. However, by prioritizing my health and physical fitness, I’ve gained confidence, energy, and found myself more productive in these other areas. In some ways, this goes hand-in-hand with my other goal – learning to tell people “no.” We all have a finite amount of time in a day. It is tempting to overcommit to work deadlines, professional events, and even social engagements. By overcommitting, you set yourself up to underperform, or you end up sacrificing other things. Learning how to respectfully tell people “no” or at least to manage expectations and not overcommit has allowed me to more fully engage with and enjoy the projects and activities I do attend.

Stella O’Rourke, Corporate Development Manager, UMOM New Day Centers

Answer: I really have started to focus on me and what is best for my overall health so I look for balance in my personal and professional lives. I would love to get better at changing my eating habits though—Phoenix has too many good places to eat!

 

 

Jill Foley, Managing Partner – Four Leaf Financial & Accounting, PLLC

Answer: I’m an avid networker and have built a great network of fellow professionals that has served my career well. I’m actively working on not saying “yes” to everything, as it can lead to overcommitment and burnout.

Posted by Danny Imes